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BSc (Hons) Forensic Biology

  • Late
  • UCAS Code:
    F3B7
  • Institution:
    B50
  • Delivery:
    Full time according to Funding Council definitions

Forensic biologists are crucial to crime scene analysis, helping to help identify victims and support criminal investigations. Forensic biologists also work in the field of endangered species, helping to identify illegal trading of fur and feathers, investigating disease that could threaten animal or human health.

Using our sophisticated lab and field equipment, you will collect and analyse biological evidence and write detailed logs and reports, so attention to detail is important. As part of this course you'll take part in invaluable lab and fieldwork experience, including mock crime scenes and disasters and graduate with a broad set of forensic skills and be prepared for the anticipated demand within the sector. You also may have opportunities to work with our staff on their current forensic research projects.

96 - 100% of students on similar courses at BU think our staff are good at explaining things and make their subjects interesting, so do come along and meet us to find out for yourself!

Interested in studying this course part-time? Enquire now.

All statistics shown are taken from Unistats, Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE), BU institutional data and Ipsos MORI (National Student Survey) unless otherwise stated.

Key information

Next start date:

September 2017, September 2018

Location:

Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus

Duration:

3 years full-time with an optional short placement or 4 years with a minimum 30-week placement

Required subjects:

At least one of the following subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Human Biology, Applied Science, Maths.

Entry requirements:

For 2017 entry: (we will use the new UCAS tariff): 104 - 120 tariff points including 3 A-levels including 32 from one required subject (e.g. C at A-Level), or equivalent qualifications. BTEC Extended Diploma: DMM. For more information check out our 2017 entry requirements page

For 2018 entry: 104-120 tariff points from 3 A-levels or equivalent including 32 points from a required subject. BTEC Extended Diploma: DMM.For more information check out our 2018 entry requirements page

International entry requirements:

If English is not your first language you'll need IELTS 6.5 (Academic) (with minimum 5.5 in each of the 4 components) or equivalent. For more information check out our International entry requirements page.

Course details

On this course you will usually be taught by a range of staff with relevant expertise and knowledge appropriate to the content of the unit. This will include senior academic staff, qualified professional practitioners, demonstrators, technicians and research students. You will also benefit from regular guest lectures from industry.

Year 1

Core units

  • AAFS Study Skills: Fundamental skills for any scientist are the ability to work with a range of field and lab data. This unit will provide you with the knowledge to perform statistical analysis, create charts, graphs & maps, and write clear and concise reports using appropriate software packages.
  • Cell Biology: Cells are the basic unit of life and hence knowledge of cell biology is fundamental to understanding wider concepts in biology. This unit introduces key themes in cell biology to provide a sound underpinning knowledge of cells and the way they function. The unit will equip you with an understanding of cell structure, function, control, basic molecular biology, the interaction of cells with viruses and the basic experimental techniques used to investigate cells.
  • Chemistry: You will be provided with an understanding of some aspects and processes within fundamental chemistry and analytical chemistry and develop your laboratory skills. The unit will predominately be delivered through lectures and practical laboratory sessions. The laboratory sessions will enable reinforcement of the theoretical concepts by dealing with experimentally generated data and will allow for one-to-one and small group discussions.
  • Diversity of Life: Gain an understanding of the origin and diversity of life on earth, how the environment and selection have shaped the patterns of distribution of plants, animals and micro-organisms since life first originated some 3.5 billion years ago, and how it is increasingly being influenced by humans. You will have insights into the basis for classifying organisms and in dealing with the relationships among major groups, and examine the organisation and structure of major groups of living (and some fossil) organisms (microbes, protists, higher plants, invertebrates and vertebrates). You will cover aspects of body size and life history strategies.
  • Human Anatomy & Physiology: Giving you an overview of the structure and function of the human body, you will be introduced to the principal concepts underlying pathophysiological processes that disturb health. Key biological and physiological practical techniques relevant to measuring human health and disease are covered, together with the skills you will need for the analysis and presentation of the resulting data.
  • Introduction to Forensic Investigation: This unit will provide you with a deeper appreciation of the legal aspects, command structure and operational procedures of UK forensic investigations and provide a deeper insight into a range of forensic sciences available. It will provide you with the theoretical understanding to enhance practical experience in the recovery of physical evidence.

Year 2

Core units

  • Advanced Cell Biology: Building on the fundamental principles from year 1, you will examine the operation of cells, and the control, development and modification of cells in multicellular organisms. You will also discover more about stem cell technologies and therapeutic applications, cancer development and cell culture techniques.
  • Biochemistry: Developing your core knowledge from the first year units in biology and chemistry, you will gain an appreciation of systems biology through the introduction of metabolism interconnectivity, and an overview of macromolecules and their metabolism. Topics will include the structure and function of DNA and enzyme structure and kinetics.
  • Crime Scene: This unit aims to provide details on the legal aspects, command structure and operational procedures of UK scene of crime investigations and provide an introduction to a range of forensic sciences. It will also provide practical experience in the recovery of evidence from potential scenes of crime.
  • Forensic Law & Practice: You will critically consider the criminal justice system in England and Wales and engage with the central issues common to any major criminal justice system. You will be equipped with a greater knowledge of criminal procedure including a comprehensive coverage of the entire criminal process from police investigation through to trial process to appeals and rectifications of miscarriages of justice.
  • Forensic Science: The basic scientific and analytical principals underlying the practice of forensic science will be explored in this unit. You will be introduced to a range of basic case types and to the analytical techniques commonly employed in forensic casework.

Option units

Semester 2 (choose one)

  • Biology for Forensic Sciences: Building on the introduction to this subject provided in Introduction to Forensic Investigation, you will apply different basic biological techniques employed in forensic investigations and develop your knowledge of diatom, pollen, fungi, vertebrate and invertebrate evidence and also of biological casework and its importance in forensic investigations. Topics may also include human tissue evidence, post-mortem estimation (entomology) and the biological contamination of food and wildlife crimes. You will also learn how to write appropriately structured scientific reports.
  • Case Studies in Forensic Science: Discover how forensic science has developed and impacted on the investigation of crime and Criminal Justice System by studying and discussing a selection of cases from the published literature and trial transcripts. You will learn about the process of case investigation in modern policing; how a lawyer/barrister prepares a case for court and understand the role and responsibilities of the forensic expert and the impact that may have on a legal investigation.
  • Evolutionary Biology: In this broad overview of the factors of species evolution, you will be introduced to selection forces, heredity and Mendelian genetics. You will discuss issues such as adaptation, natural selection and population genetics principles, and apply your critical understanding to issues such as conservation biology.
  • Introduction to Toxicology: The basic principles of toxicology will be explored in this unit, designed to offer foundation knowledge for those intending to study toxicology at higher levels or for those intending to study subjects peripheral to toxicology or where a basic understanding of toxicology will be relevant.

Please note that option units require minimum numbers in order to run and may only be available on a semester by semester basis. They may also change from year to year.

Year 3 (Placement)

You may choose to complete an optional 30-week minimum or a short 5 week industrial work placement. You'll get an opportunity to include a period of academic study during this time. The placement year offers a chance to gain experience and make contacts for the future.

Year 3/4 (Final year)

Core units

  • Advanced Forensic Science: You will enhance your knowledge and critical thinking skills associated with the scientific and analytical principals underlying the practice of forensic science in this unit. You will gain in depth knowledge of key areas of forensic science.
  • Advanced Topics in Genetics: You will consider how this modern discipline underpins all aspects of biology. You will be actively involved in discussions about the ethical issues of genetics as well as introduce bioinformatics analysis of data. We will consider the role of pharmacogenomics, epigenetics, endophenotypes and optogenetics plays in current research outputs as well as the classical model D. melanogaster now has in fundamental biology.
  • Independent Research Project: The Independent Research Project provides you with an opportunity to gain experience of research in a topic of your choice relevant to your degree and to demonstrate your ability to report that research. Such experience is considered essential for those students interested in pursuing academic and/or professional research at a higher level of responsibility and achievement.

Option units

Semester 1 (choose one)

  • Environmental Forensics: Issues in Environmental Forensics range from pollution investigations to wildlife crime at local, national and international levels. You will learn to select appropriate analytical and forensic techniques used in an environmental crime investigation and understand both the legal and cultural issues faced when investigating wildlife crimes nationally, internationally and trans-frontier. You will need an awareness of the organisations involved in investigation and prosecution, so there will be presentations from appropriate organisations and the opportunity to take part in practical activities.

  • Forensic Toxicology: This unit aims to provide you with a knowledge and understanding of the complex issues involved with the analysis of common drugs and poisons in human tissues and the ways in which they exert their effects on the body and influence behaviour.

  • Pathophysiology: The detailed study of the molecular bases of a number of important clinical states will be a major component of the unit. We aim to develop your knowledge and understanding of the principal biological mechanisms involved in a range of pathological processes, inherited, malignant, infectious and degenerative diseases including cancer, inherited disease, heart disease, diabetes, infectious diseases, immunological conditions and organ-specific disorders. The transmission of infections, the role of the scientist in control and prevention of disease will be discussed, together with the social and political issues raised by such measures such as vaccination, hygiene and sanitation.

Semester 2 (choose one):

  • Biomolecules: By the end of this science based unit you will be conversant with the concepts and approaches of holism compared with reductionism in modern biological sciences. It will review the principles of biology and modern biotechnologies from molecular levels to systems biology, such as DNA analysis, DNA profiling, functional genomics, gene expression and cDNA microarray, proteomics and protein interactions, epigenetics, bioinformatics, recombinant DNA, and biotechnology.
  • Forensic Entomology: This unit builds on the introduction to this subject provided in Introduction to Forensic Investigation. Topics may include an introduction to insect biology, an overview of insect taxonomy, the decomposition of human tissue, post mortem interval assessment, the use of invertebrates for forensic investigation and entomotoxicology.

Please note that option units require minimum numbers in order to run and may only be available on a semester by semester basis. They may also change from year to year.

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

Contact hours

The hours below give an indication of how you can expect to spend your time during each year of this course. You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops and practical sessions. Your independent learning could include reading books and journal articles, working on group projects, preparing presentations, conducting library research and writing your assignments. On this coruse, you will benefit from a variety of teaching methods including laboratory based practicals, lectures and fieldwork.

In your third year you will have the opportunity to solve real world biological problems by observation and recoding of biological science activity in both the field and lab which will be heavily independently based.

Year 1 – 24% of your time will be spent in timetabled learning & teaching activities

  • Learning and teaching: 276 hours (estimated)
  • Independent learning: 924 hours (estimated)

Year 2 – 31% of your time will be spent in timetabled learning & teaching activities

  • Learning and teaching: 372 hours (estimated)
  • Independent learning: 828 hours (estimated)

Year 3 - 19% of your time will be spent in timetabled learning & teaching activities

  • Learning and teaching: 228 hours (estimated)
  • Independent learning: 972 hours (estimated)

64% of the course is assessed by coursework

  • Year 1 67%
  • Year 2 59%
  • Final year 67%

Throughout the course you will be assessed by coursework culminating in your final year research project, but you will also undertake group work and written exams.

Programme specification

Programme specifications provide definitive records of the University's taught degrees in line with Quality Assurance Agency requirements. Every taught course leading to a BU Award has a programme specification which describes its aims, structure, content and learning outcomes, plus the teaching, learning and assessment methods used.

Download the programme specification for BSc (Hons) Forensic Biology.

Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the programme specification, the information is liable to change to take advantage of exciting new approaches to teaching and learning as well as developments in industry. If you have been unable to locate the programme specification for the course you are interested in, it will be available as soon as the latest version is ready. Alternatively please contact us for assistance.

All statistics shown are taken from Unistats, Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE), BU institutional data and Ipsos MORI (National Student Survey) unless otherwise stated.

Placement opportunities

At BU, we recognise that placements are extremely valuable and can give you a head start when it comes to your future career; therefore we now offer every new student the opportunity to undertake a work placement as part of their course. You can read about the experiences of some of our current students.

We will provide a great deal of help and support to ensure you achieve a rewarding and satisfying placement. You can also choose to take your placement abroad, giving you the opportunity to develop yourself personally, academically, and professionally and gain skills to help you stand out in the job market.

How long is my placement?

You will begin your placement after completion of your second year of study for a short period, or for a minimum of 30 weeks during your third year of study.

Your application

Background and experience

For this course we are looking for students with:

  • An understanding of what archaeology and forensic sciences are
  • Enthusiasm for applying science to solve problems both in the study of the past and the present
  • An interest in both laboratory and field sciences
  • Good written and oral communication skills, and the ability to think analytically
  • An interest in archaeology, and forensic science (e.g. by attending an excavation, visiting museums, entering science competitions, school project work, or relevant volunteer work).

Students on this course will have a lively interest in the application of science in archaeological and forensic contexts, and have an interest in studying human remains. The study and practice of archaeological and forensic sciences involves a variety of skills, including those used in the field, in the laboratory, and based on wide reading so applicants should be happy learning to work in all these areas. We look for innovative thinkers who are interested in understanding the past and present through practical and scientific investigation.

Applicants will have strong analytical problem-solving and communication skills, both written and oral, as archaeological and forensic sciences involves working well as an individual and also as part of a multi-disciplinary team. We seek students with enquiring minds who are comfortable using science, technology and creative thought to apply in their studies and would encourage applicants who are interested in exploring new ideas and concepts and applying knowledge across disciplines.

Selection methods

We’ll be selecting the candidates for this course by looking at their UCAS applications. You may also be invited to attend an interview. For that reason, make sure your application really stands out from the crowd, and leave us in no doubt as to why you should be joining BU. You can find some handy hints about filling in your UCAS form on our how to apply webpages.

Our offer making process

Our offer making will typically be based on your main graded qualifications, including any required subjects. Additional study may be valuable for breadth of study, and we will look at a range of qualifications and subjects, including the Extended Project Qualification and General Studies, although these may not be part of our offer.

If you do not meet the criteria of your original offer, we may still offer you a place. We will review your whole application and consider all academic qualifications (including those not in the offer) and the rest of the application to see if you have the academic potential to succeed on the course. If we feel the answer is yes, we will still confirm your place.

How we'll assess your application

We look at individual applications and make a tailored offer based on your potential to succeed on the course considering a range of factors, including your academic achievements, work and other experience, predicted grades, reference and personal statement, and in some cases, your performance at an interview/selection test.

If you meet one or more of our contextual data indicators for educational disadvantage (such as being in care, living in a low participation neighbourhood or in an area with less advantaged socio-economic characteristics), your offer could be between 6-20 points below the published tariff.

Unconditional offer scheme (2017 entry)

Our Unconditional Offer Scheme seeks to reward exceptional applicants who are predicted to achieve top academic results. The scheme is offered to applicants on all courses who are predicted AAA at A-level/triple Distinction in BTEC Extended Diploma, or above, or equivalent, subject to any course selection measures and meeting other entry criteria (i.e. required qualifications). What’s more we’ll recognise your achievement if you meet these grades with an Academic Excellence Scholarship from £1,500 when you arrive*.

We believe that unconditional offers will reduce pressure on applicants who will continue to strive to achieve the best grades possible. Excellent grades will become a part of applicants’ CVs and are also required for BU’s scholarships. International qualifications are considered in the scheme; however applicants must satisfy the English language requirements. *Our scholarships are subject to terms, conditions and eligibility criteria, detailed on our scholarships pages.

2017 entry requirements

The new UCAS Tariff will be used for September 2017 entry

104 - 120 tariff points including 3 A-Levels including 32 from one required subject (e.g. C at A-Level), or equivalent qualifications. BTEC Extended Diploma: DMM.

UCAS have created a helpful calculator so you can calculate points to use for courses starting from September 2017 onwards.

Excluded subjects: This course does not accept General Studies

Numeracy and literacy: We need to be sure that you can express yourself in written English and have basic numeracy skills. We look at Level 2 of the National Qualifications Framework, which includes, but is not limited to, GCSEs, iGCSEs, Key Skills and Functional Skills Level 2. If you do not have formal qualifications to this level or have alternatives, we may still be able to consider your application – please contact the askBU Enquiry Service to find out more.

GCSEs: A minimum of 4 GCSEs grades A* - C (or grade 4 or above in the newly reformed GCSE grading) including a Science, Maths and English or equivalent qualifications.

Other qualifications

We have outlined below other qualifications that we consider for this course. If you are studying a qualification that is not listed, please contact the askBU Enquiry Service. It may be that we can still consider it.

Access Courses: BU welcomes Access to HE Diploma applicants. This course requires applicants to Pass the Access to HE Diploma (Science) (with 60 Credits - at least 45 at level 3, remainder at level 2 or equivalent).  Any combination of grades to meet the overall tariff is acceptable (subjects may be specified). 

BTEC Qualifications

  • Extended Diploma: This course requires from Distinction, Merit, Merit.

  • Diploma: This course requires at least Distinction, Merit in a required subject in addition to one A-level in a required subject.

  • 90-credit Diploma: The 90-credit Diploma will be accepted as part of your overall tariff but it must be accompanied by A-levels or equivalent qualifications.

  • Subsidiary Diploma: This course requires at least a Distinction in addition to two A-levels in required subjects.

A combination of BTEC qualifications to meet the overall course tariff is also acceptable.

Cambridge Pre-U Diploma: We welcome applicants studying the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma or a combination of Pre-U subjects and A-levels.

European Baccalaureate: Applicants are required to achieve a minimum score of 71-75% overall.

International Baccalaureate (Diploma): The IB Diploma is welcomed as part of the International Baccalaureate (IB). This course requires 28-31 points including 5 points from each of the 3 Higher Level subjects.

Scottish Qualifications: Scottish Advanced Highers, Scottish Highers and other Scottish qualifications are all welcomed providing that your results meet the overall course tariff and include required subjects as appropriate.

Welsh Baccalaureate: The Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma is welcomed alongside A-Levels or equivalent, to meet the overall course tariff.

OCR Level 3 Cambridge Technical Qualification: The OCR Extended Diploma or a combination of one Diploma plus one Introductory Diploma is acceptable for entry to this course.

  • Extended Diploma: This course requires Distinction, Merit, Merit in a required subject.

Other combinations of OCR Level 3 Cambridge Technical qualifications to meet the overall course tariff may be acceptable.

Extended Project Qualification: The grade achieved for the Extended Project may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has marginally failed to meet the conditions of their offer.

Deferred Entry: We are happy to consider applicants for deferred entry.

2018 entry requirements

We use the UCAS Tariff to show our entry requirements and will accept a combination of grades from your qualifications. You can use the UCAS calculator to see how your qualifications equate to tariff points.

The entry requirements for this course are 104-120 tariff points from 3 A-levels or equivalent including 32 points from a required subject. BTEC Extended Diploma: DMM.

Excluded subjects: General Studies

GCSEs: This course requires a minimum of 4 GCSEs grades A* - C (or grade 4 or above in the newly reformed GCSE grading) including a Science, Maths and English or equivalent qualifications.

Numeracy and literacy: We need to be sure that you can express yourself in written English and have basic numeracy skills. We look at Level 2 of the National Qualifications Framework, which includes, but is not limited to, GCSEs, iGCSEs, Key Skills and Functional Skills Level 2. If you do not have formal qualifications to this level or have alternatives, we may still be able to consider your application – please contact the askBU Enquiry Service to find out more.

Other qualifications: We have outlined below other qualifications that we consider for this course. If you are studying a qualification that is not listed, please contact the askBU Enquiry Service. It may be that we can still consider it.

Access courses: 102 - 118 tariff points in a required subject with any combination of Distinction, Merit, Pass grades.

BTEC qualifications:

  • Extended Diploma: This course requires Distinction, Merit, Merit (112 tariff points)
  • Diploma: Accepted as part of the overall tariff but it must be accompanied by an A-level or equivalent.
  • 90-credit Diploma: Accepted as part of the overall tariff but it must be accompanied by A-levels or equivalent.
  • Subsidiary Diploma: Accepted as part of the overall tariff but it must be accompanied by A-levels or equivalent.

Cambridge Pre-U Diploma: 104-120 tariff points from 3 principal subjects including 36 points from a required subject

Cambridge Technical qualifications:

  • Extended Diploma: This course requires Distinction, Merit, Merit (112 tariff points)
  • Diploma: Accepted as part of the overall tariff but it must be accompanied by an A-level or equivalent.
  • Subsidiary Diploma: Accepted as part of the overall tariff but it must be accompanied by A-levels or equivalent.
  • Introductory Diploma: Accepted as part of the overall tariff but it must be accompanied by A-levels or equivalent.

International Baccalaureate Diploma: 28-31 points overall including grade H5 from 3 Higher Level subjects.

Scottish Advanced Highers: 104-120 tariff points from 3 Advanced Highers including 32 points from a required subject.

Welsh Baccalaureate: Accepted as part of the overall tariff but it must be accompanied by A-levels or equivalent.

Extended Project Qualification: Not accepted as part of the overall tariff.

Deferred entry: We are happy to consider applicants for deferred entry.

International entry requirements

English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you will need to provide evidence that you can understand English to a satisfactory level. English language requirements for this course are normally:

IELTS (Academic) 6.5 with minimum 5.5 in each component, or equivalent.

View further information about our English language requirements.

If you do not meet the English language requirement for your degree then why not join our Pre-Sessional English course? Successful completion of our Pre-Sessional English course will meet your English language requirement, without the need to re-take IELTS.

Academic entry requirements

You can find details of the international qualifications we accept, and what level of study they apply to, on our entry requirements for non-UK students’ page.

Careers

This is a new course and it has been designed to give you all the experience you need to enter the field of forensics, which can include biological, conservation, criminal and healthcare settings, among others. You'll gain a wealth of practical experience in labs and through fieldwork that will give you an edge when you begin searching for work.

Although we don't have any graduates from this course yet, students who have completed one of our other forensics degrees have performed well once they leave BU. 90%* of our Forensic Science students are in work or further study within six months of finishing their course, working for the likes of forensic science laboratories, hospital laboratories and local authority enforcement agencies. The jobs they have gone into include:

  • Collision Investigator
  • Biological scientists and biochemists
  • Junior forensic examiner
  • Lab technician
  • Teacher.

Industries worked in

  • Environmental science
  • Forensic and biomedical research
  • Education
  • Forensics
  • Healthcare.

Further study

Once you have completed an undergraduate Honours degree, you can further develop your education by studying for a postgraduate degree. Please visit our Postgraduate section for further details about our range of Master's degrees.

All statistics shown are taken from Unistats, Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE), BU institutional data and Ipsos MORI (National Student Survey) unless otherwise stated.

No hidden extras

Course specific material(s) included in your tuition fee:

  • Lab coats, safety glasses
  • Compulsory/assessed fieldwork

As a student at BU we will provide many things to support you and there will also be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying at BU. The information below will help you understand our provision and what you need to budget for.

What you can expect from us

All of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees including lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of support and services. You will receive more information about these if you are offered a place on the course.

  • One set of study-related consumables such as a memory stick/DVD
  • Materials for laboratory and field-based teaching activity
  • Support for placements (UK or abroad) and fieldwork, and non-financial support whilst on placement
  • A range of student services – advisors, help desks, counsellors, placement support and careers service
  • The Library – access to a wide range of electronic resources (databases, e-journals and e-books), print and multimedia collections, subject librarians and study spaces
  • IT labs (some open 24/7), wireless network, AV equipment to borrow
  • Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) scheme
  • Disability and additional learning support
  • The BU Language Centre to help you develop/improve foreign or English language skills
  • 24 hours a day, 365 days a year security team.

Costs of living and other expenses you need to consider

  • Accommodation and living costs: view our price guide
  • Text books: remember that our award-winning library is stocked with a large range of text books for all courses, as well as online resources such as industry journals, free of charge
  • General stationery and other supplies such as print and presentation materials: the Students’ Union shops stock a wide range of stationery supplies on both campuses
  • Travel to, from and between BU campuses: our bus service operates in the local areas offering a subsided travel rate; we also have a large number of secure bike storage compounds
  • SportBU membership: check out our student membership packages, sports events, varsity teams, information about our new facilities and more on the SportBU webpages
  • Optional fieldwork travel, outdoor wear and footwear (where applicable)
  • Telephone and travel costs incurred when undertaking interviews for coursework/securing placements.
  • A fee will be payable towards the cost of an Educational Psychology Assessment if this is required in connection with additional learning support. BU pays for approximately two-thirds of the cost of this assessment for UK students. For more details and current pricing please visit the Student section of the website

Repeat units

If you need to repeat one or more units during the course of your studies (with or without attendance) you  you may be required to pay an additional fee of £1,500 per 20 credit unit.  

Financial help available from BU

We offer a range of scholarships and bursaries to students who are beginning their studies at BU. Our website also provides details on living costs, budgeting and paying your tuition fees.

Course changes

This table indicates any changes to the course content

Date Changes to this course Where the change was made Notes
08/01/2016

New option unit in Year 2: Biology for Forensic Sciences

New option unit in Year 3: Forensic Entomology

Course details content See Course details above

08/01/2016

Removed option unit in Year 2

Course details content

Bonobos, Bones & Bottlenecks: Lectures and lab work will introduce you to the basic principles of modern human variation, adaptation and the evolutionary forces that have influenced them. You will study the core concepts of heredity, adaptation and variation applied to humans and other primates. Attention is also given to all living primates and to the primate fossil record.

03/03/2017

Moved Pathophysiology unit from semester 1 to semester 2

Moved Forensic Entomology unit from semester 2 to semester 1

Course details content

Meet our staff

Dr Andrew Whittington joined the staff of Bournemouth University (BU) in June 2015, as a Senior Lecturer in Forensic Science. As a trained taxonomist, Entomologist and Dipterist, he moved laterally from Museum Curator to consultancy work, including Forensic Entomology, using expert identification skills to create a private company. Primarily a Forensic Entomologist, Andrew's interests range over a broad selection of subjects including postmortem interval, entomotoxicology, insects as bio-weapons, Diptera taxonomy, pollination biology and insects as extremeophiles.

Read more about the specialist interests of our Archaeology, Anthropology & Forensic Science staff online, or register now to meet us!

Facilities

Forensics laboratory

Forensics lab

Learn about the latest equipment we have in our forensics lab and find out how it can prepare you for work.

Crime scene training facility

Crime scene training facility

Find out more about our crime scene training facility, where you can gain practical experience of forensic fieldwork.

Genetics labs

Genetics labs

Explore our genetics labs and see what equipment we have available for you to use during your course.

Additional information

Fees and funding

Fees and funding

Find out about fees and funding, including scholarships and bursaries.

Open day walking courtyard

Open Days

We give a warm welcome to anyone who comes to meet us and we love showing off our campuses and Bournemouth to prospective students and their families. 

Omolola Fagbule

International students

We have a strong international student community. Find all the practical advice and information you need here.